Thursday, August 11, 2022

Living Trust and Wills - By the People


Living Trust or a will? Rene talks about some of the differences and what sets one apart from the other to help you make the best decision for your needs.

1371-C Oliver Road
Fairfield, California 94534

By Phone: 707.428.9871
By Fax: 707.428.9873

By Email: btpfairfield@sbcglobal.net

Monday, August 8, 2022

Steps of Probate

If the decedent dies without a will, known as intestacy, with the exception of real properly located in another jurisdiction, the estate is distributed according to the laws of the jurisdiction where the decedent resided.

If the decedent died with a will, the will usually names an executor (personal representative), who carries out the instructions laid out in the will. The executor marshals the decedent's assets. If there is no will, or if the will does not name an executor, the probate court can appoint one. Traditionally, the representative of an intestate estate is called an administrator. If the decedent died with a will, but only a copy of the will can be located, many states allow the copy to be probated, subject to the rebuttable presumption that the testator destroyed the will before death.

In some cases, where the person named as executor cannot administer the probate, or wishes to have someone else do so, another person is named administrator. An executor or an administrator may receive compensation for his service. Additionally, beneficiaries of an estate may be able to remove the appointed executor if he or she is not capable of properly fulfilling his or her duties.

The representative of a testate estate who is someone other than the executor named in the will is an administrator with the will annexed, or administrator c.t.a. (from the Latin cum testamento annexo.) The generic term for executors or administrators is personal representative.

The probate court may require that the executor provide a fidelity bond, an insurance policy in favor of the estate to protect against possible abuse by the executor.

Read more, here.

1371-C Oliver Road
Fairfield, California 94534

By Phone: 707.428.9871
By Fax: 707.428.9873

By Email: btpfairfield@sbcglobal.net

Friday, August 5, 2022

Estates in the United States

Most estates in the United States include property that is subject to probate proceedings. If the property of an estate is not automatically devised to a surviving spouse or heir through principles of joint ownership or survivorship, or otherwise by operation of law, and was not transferred to a trust during the decedent's lifetime, it is generally necessary to "probate the estate", whether or not the decedent had a valid will. For example, life insurance and retirement accounts with properly completed beneficiary designations should avoid probate, as will most bank accounts titled jointly or made payable on death.

Some states have procedures that allow for the transfer of assets from small estates through affidavit or through a simplified probate process. For example, California has a "Small Estate Summary Procedure" to allow the summary transfer of a decedent's asset without a formal Probate proceeding. The dollar limit by which the Small Estate procedure can be effectuated is $150,000.

For estates that do not qualify for simplified proceedings, a court having jurisdiction of the decedent's estate (a probate court) supervises the probate process to ensure administration and disposition of the decedent's property is conducted in accord with the law of that jurisdiction, and in a manner consistent with decedent's intent as manifested in his will. Distribution of certain estate assets may require selling assets, including real estate.

Read more, here.

1371-C Oliver Road
Fairfield, California 94534

By Phone: 707.428.9871
By Fax: 707.428.9873

By Email: btpfairfield@sbcglobal.net

Tuesday, August 2, 2022

What Is Probate?


Probate is simply the process for proving to the appropriate court that a document is the deceased's last will and testament and that the deceased knew what it was and signed it under his person, under his own free will, at a time he was mentally competent, and the document was properly witnessed, getting authority from the court to gather the assets, pay the deceased's obligations, and the distribute the assets to the beneficiaries named in the will.

1371-C Oliver Road
Fairfield, California 94534

By Phone: 707.428.9871
By Fax: 707.428.9873

By Email: btpfairfield@sbcglobal.net